Health Bridge

About

Health Bridge is an envisioned system that encourages the use of Personal Health Records (PHRs) by providing interoperable assistive tools to help low-socioeconomic families manage their health. Although there are many PHRs available today, not many people use them because it is unclear what are the motivations for continued use. Low socioeconomic individuals could benefit from PHRs because they could efficiently share health information with the multitude of healthcare professionals they see. In our previous research, we found that low socioeconomic caregivers receive a lot of health promotion literature, but are unsure how to apply the information to their own culturally influenced lives. Health Bridge will provide families a way to input nutritional information into a PHR and receive personalized feedback on what they are consuming and how they can integrate healthier, culturally sensitive options into their diets.

Funding: National Science Foundation (Award # IIS-0846024) including EMR subproject
New Professor Award in the College of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
Nokia Research
Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance
Collaborators: The Bridge Project, University of Denver
Acknowledgements: Ken Browning Travel Scholarship
Julie Maitland

 

Publications

  • Danish U. Khan*, Swamy Ananthanarayan*, An T. Le#, Christopher L. Schaefbauer* and Katie A. Siek. Designing Mobile Snack Application for Low Socioeconomic Status Families. In 6th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare, page 57 – 64, 2012. Acceptance Rate: 34%. [PDF]
  • Danish U. Khan*, Katie A. Siek, and Swamy Ananthanarayan*. Towards Designing Health Management Interfaces for Low Socioeconomic Families. In 6th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare, page 167 – 170, 2012. [PDF]
  • Danish U. Khan*, An T. Le#, and Katie A. Siek. Designing a Sociotechnological Intervention to Improve Snacking in Low Socioeconomic Families. In Workshop on Interactive Systems in Healthcare (WISH), pp: 72-76, Oct 22, 2011. [pdf]
  • Danish U. Khan*, Swamy Ananthanarayan*, and Katie A. Siek. Exploring Everyday Health Routines of a Low Socioeconomic Population through Multimedia Elicitations. Journal of Participatory Medicine, Vol 3(e39):10 pages, August 29, 2011. Download: [HTML]
  • R. E. Grinter, K. A. Siek, and A. Grimes. Wellness informatics: towards a definition and grand challenges. In CHI EA ’10: Proceedings of the 28th of the international conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems, pages 4505-4508, New York, NY, USA, 2010. ACM. [HTML]
  • K. A. Siek and J. Maitland. Studying the place of technology to lower financial barriers for dietary change. Methods of information in medicine, 49(1):74-80, 2010. [HTML]
  • R. E. Grinter, K. A. Siek, and A. Grimes. Is wellness informatics a field of human-centered health informatics? interactions, 17(1):76-79, 2010. [HTML]
  • K. A. Siek, J. S. LaMarche, and J. Maitland. Bridging the information gap: Collaborative technology design with low-income at-risk families to engender healthy behaviors. In OZCHI ’09: Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference of the Australian Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group, pages 89-96, New York, NY, USA, 2009. ACM. [HTML] Presentation Movie
  • J. Maitland and K. A. Siek. Technological approaches to promoting physical activity. In OZCHI ’09: Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference of the Australian Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group, pages 277-280, New York, NY, USA, 2009. ACM. [HTML] Presentation Movie
  • J. Maitland and K.A. Siek. Small Hammers and Silver Bullets: Low-Income Families Dietary Behavioral Change and Ubicomp. In UbiComp 2009 Workshop: GlobiComp. [HTML]
  • J. Maitland, K. A. Siek, and M. Chalmers. Persuasion not required: Obstacles faced by low-income caregiers to improve dietary behaviour. In Pervasive Healthcare 2009: Proceedings of the 3rd International ICST Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare 2009, 2009. (36% Acceptance; Nominated for Best Paper – 13.5% accepted papers nominated; 4.95% submitted papers nominated). [HTML]
  • K. A. Siek, S. E. Ross, K. H. Connelly, J.S. LaMarche, D.U. Khan, and B. Chaudry. Challenges in Evaluating Three Assistive Health Applications. In CHI 2009 Workshop: Evaluating New Interactions in Healthcare: Challenges and Approaches. [HTML]

Media

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. (IIS-0846024). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

* denotes graduate student collaborators at the time of writing
#  denotes undergraduate student collaborators at the time of writing
† Written during grant period

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